Index | Search | Home

Doob (Cynodon dactylon): Traditional Medicinal Uses in India

Pankaj Oudhia
Society for Parthenium Management (SOPAM)
28-A, Geeta Nagar, Raipur - 492001 India
pankajoudhia@gmail.com
www.pankajoudhia.com

Copyright © 2001. All Rights Reserved. Quotation from this document should cite and acknowledge the contributor.

Cynodon dactylon Pers. (Poaceae), a hardy perennial grass, is one of the most commonly occurring weeds in India. In Hindi it is known as dhub, doob, or harialil; other common names include durba (Bengali), garikoihallu (Kanarese), durva (Marathi), durva or haritali (Sanskrit), arugampullu (Tamil), garikagoddi (Telugu) and dhubkhabbal (Punjabi) (Sastry and Kavathekar, 1990). Although a problem for farmers, doob ghas is a valuable herbal medicinal and used as first aid for minor injuries (Oudhia, 1999a,b). Farmers traditionally apply crushed leaves to minor wounds as a styptik to stop bleeding similar to Tridax procumbens, Achyranthes aspera, and Blumea iacera, Oudhia, and Pal, 2000). Cynodon has a renown position in Indian systems of medicine and many parts of the plants are assumed to have medicinal properties. A traditional use of Cynodon is for eye disorders and weak vision; the afflicted are advised to walk bare foot on dew drops spread over Cynodon plant each morning. According to Ayurveda, India's traditional pharmacopoeia, Cynodon plant is pungent, bitter, fragrant, heating, appetizer, vulnerary, anthelmintic, antipyretic, alexiteric. It destroys foulness of breath, useful in leucoderma, bronchitis, piles, asthma, tumors, and enlargement of the spleen. According to Unani system of medicine, Cynodon plant is bitter, sharp hot taste, good odor, laxative, brain and heart tonic, aphrodisiac, alexipharmic, emetic, emmenagogue, expectorant, carminative and useful against grippe in children, and for pains, inflammations, and toothache (Agharkar 1991). Virus-affected discolored leaves of Cynodon are used for the treatment of liver complaints.. In Homoeopathic systems of medicine, it is used to treat all types of bleeding and skin troubles (Ghosh 1988; Oudhia et al. 1998).

References

Agharkar, S.P. 1991. Medicinal plants of Bombay presidency. Scientific Publ., Jodhpur, India, p. 80-87.

Oudhia, P. 1999a. Medicinal weeds in rice fields of Chhattisgarh (India). Int. Rice Res. Notes. 24(1): 40.

Oudhia, P. 1999b. Medicinal weeds in groundnut fields of Chhattisgarh (India). Int. Arachis Newslett. 19:62-64.

Oudhia, P. and A.R. Pal. 2000. Rainy season medicinal weed flora in wastelands of Chamra nallah watershed area at Bagbahera. J. Medicinal Aromatic Plant Sci. 22/4A & 23/1A : 44-449.

Oudhia,P., B.S. Joshi, and V.K. Kosta. 1998. The possibilities of preparing homeopathic drugs from the obnoxious weeds of Chhattisgarh. Bhartiya Krishi Anusandhan Patrika. 13(1/2):53-57.

Sastry, C.S.T. and K.Y. Kovathekar, 1990. Plants for reclamation of wastelands. Publications and Information Directorate, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi. p. 219-220.

Pankaj Oudhia
Society for Parthenium Management (SOPAM)
28-A, Geeta Nagar, Raipur - 492001 India
pankajoudhia@gmail.com
archive.org/details/pankajoudhia
www.youtube.com/user/pankajoudhia?feature=results_main
www.flickr.com/photos/pankajoudhia/


Copyright © 2015, Purdue University, all rights reserved. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity university. If you have trouble accessing this page because of a disability, please contact the NewCROP Center | email: awhipkey@purdue.edu | phone: 765-494-6968.

Last modified: June 30 2015 by aw