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Missouri CropMAP

Grain Legumes

Prepared by Dr. Rob Myers, Jefferson Institute. This is a list of pulse (large seeded) legumes for grain harvest that are either currently grown, are recommended alternate crops, are experimental crops, or are not recommended for Missouri.

Existing Crops
Recommended New, Alternate or Underutilized Crops
Experimental New Or Alternate Crops
Not Recommended

Existing Crops Crop Information Links
Soybeans The number one crop in Missouri, grown on more than twice as much acreage (5 million acres) as any other crop. About 10% of the soybean crop is grown as a double crop after wheat, primarily in the southeast portion of Missouri. Missouri
publications
extension
NewCROP
Recommended New, Alternate or Underutilized Crops
Dry edible beans (field beans) Have been grown on scattered acreage in Missouri, but mainly in the SE part of the state. Adapted varieties are available, although diseases are sometimes a problem. Obtaining market contracts is also a barrier. Missouri NewCROP
Cowpeas (black eyed peas) Well adapted crop with a variety of market types and growth types. Yields are lower and more variable than soybeans, but price per pound is higher, and cowpeas appear to be more drought tolerant. Missouri NewCROP
Mung beans Grown primarily in Oklahoma, mung beans are also well adapted to all parts of Missouri. They are most competitive with soybeans on droughty soils. On good soils with adequate available soil moisture, mung beans will usually not produce as much profit as soybeans. Missouri NewCROP
Experimental New Or Alternate Crops
Adzuki beans These beans are of the same genus as mung beans and cowpeas, and are agronomically adapted to Missouri conditions. Yields are low compared to soybeans, but price per pound is higher. Export market exists to Japan, but regular market channels from the Midwest to Japan for this crop are not established. Missouri NewCROP
Guar Grown on a small acreage in the southern Plains, this crop is mostly imported into the U.S. from India for use in processed foods. Besides its food use, it has some industrial use potential. The crop is adapted to Missouri but not very competitive with weeds, due to its slow growing nature. Missouri NewCROP
Not recommended
Faba (fava) beans A northern high protein legume, faba bean varieties tested in Missouri regularly get severe diseases. Missouri NewCROP
Lentils This small, low growing legume is not competitive against weeds in Missouri. A Mediterranean crop, it is better adapted to semi-arid areas of the Pacific Northwest. Missouri NewCROP
Chickpeas (garbanzo bean) This small legume is not competitive against weeds in Missouri. A Mediterranean crop, it is better adapted to semi-arid areas of the Pacific Northwest. Missouri NewCROP
Lab lab bean A tropical legume with large seeds. Cultivar tested in Missouri had prolific vegetation, flowered late in the summer, but did not produce seed. Missouri NewCROP
Tepary bean A legume used by Native Americans in the southwestern U.S. Tepary bean cultivars tested in Missouri produced little seed and were not very vigorous. Missouri NewCROP
Sweet white lupines Although this high protein legume has reasonably good vigor in northern states, it has not proven to be adapted to Missouri. Plants get diseased and seed yield is low. Missouri NewCROP

The grain legumes listing was compiled and written by Dr. Rob Myers, Jefferson Institute. Questions related to these crops should be addressed to Dr. Rob Myers 601 W. Nifong Blvd., Ste. 5A Columbia, MO 65203
Ph: 573-449-3518
Email: rmyers@tranquility.net